How to cured diabetes in five steps?

Thursday, December 16, 2010
It's a windfall of profits for the drug companies, diabetic supply companies and the sick care industry in general. Perhaps that's why no one is taking any real action to halt the anticipated explosion in diabetes. The more people who get sick, after all, the more money will be spent on medical treatment. (It's good for the economy, they say!)

But solutions to diabetes exist right now. I've personally interviewed patients who were cured of type-2 diabetes in as little as four days at Dr Gabriel Cousens' Tree of Life Rejuvenation Center near Tucson, Arizona ( My own book entitled How to Halt Diabetes in 25 Days has helped thousands of people prevent and even reverse diabetes in under a month. (

As NaturalNews readers know, I used to be borderline diabetic myself, and I suffered from hypoglycemia and borderline obesity at the same time. But I was able to cure my own pre-diabetes condition by doing essentially two things: 1) Ignoring all doctors and conventional medicinal information, and 2) Teaching myself the principles of nutrition (through lots of reading).

Today, about a decade later, I remain fit, healthy and athletic. At age 41, I lift weights, swim, bicycle and exercise on a regular basis while carefully choosing foods that will prevent diabetes for a lifetime.

Here are my top five secrets for preventing (and even reversing) diabetes...

My top secrets for preventing and reversing diabetes
Secret #1) Stop eating all refined sugars. This means giving up all foods made with HFCS (especially soda) or other refined sugars. If you find this step difficult, wean yourself off these foods day by day. It took me six months to finally end my sugar addiction for good. Sodas and HFCS have caused 130,000 cases of diabetes, by the way (

Secret #2) Ingest large quantities of daily superfoods. I consume at least two daily superfood smoothies made with spirulina, stabilized rice bran and high-density superfood powders such as Boku Superfood ( and Living Fuel ( I blend them with frozen organic fruit, coconut oil and almond milk. On top of that, I take daily chlorella, astaxanthin and various Chinese medicine herbs from and other high quality nutritional suppliers.

Secret #3) Exercise a little bit every day. I exercise over 12 hours a week, but that's more than you really need to prevent diabetes. Even just walking 30 minutes a day can have a huge impact on preventing diabetes. The key is to make it a daily activity.

Secret #4) Get sunshine or vitamin D. More than 70% of white Americans are vitamin D deficient. That number rises to 97% among African Americans ( Latinos and Asians are at around 80% deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency promotes diabetes (and cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, immune suppression, and so on).

So if you really want to prevent diabetes, boost your vitamin D levels with either daily sunshine or quality vitamin D3 supplements. Vitamin D deficiency explains why diabetes is so rampant among African Americans, by the way. Did you notice that doctors don't explain any of this to African American patients? It's the dirty little racist secret of both the diabetes and cancer industries...

Secret #5) Avoid all processed foods. Avoid eating refined anything. That includes white breads, processed meat (which strongly promotes diabetes) and dairy products. Switch from cow's milk to almond milk (Blue Diamond brand is good, but I suggest you avoid the Silk brand). Reduce or eliminate cheese from your diet. If you eat meat, eat only fresh unprocessed meat, never eat processed packaged meat because it contains sodium nitrite, a chemical that destroys pancreas function. This means no pepperoni pizza, no ham and potato soup, no deli meat sandwiches and so on.

To the extent that you can do these five things, you can reverse diabetes yourself! Diabetes is not a difficult disease to prevent or reverse because it's not really an affliction that "strikes" you randomly. It is merely the biological effect of following certain lifestyle (bad foods, no exercise) that can be reversed in virtually anyone, sometimes in just a few days.

I've even interviewed a type-1 diabetic who got completely off insulin by following a raw foods diet with daily vegetable juicing. Yes, type one! Read about my interview with Dr Cousens here:

(This interview will rock your world if you don't yet know that diabetes is easily curable!)

Scientific research shows, by the way, that the insulin-producing "islet cells" in the pancreas can be jump-started back to life with hot peppers (

Diabetes is nearly 100% preventable. You won't hear this from mainstream medicine -- which ridiculously claims there is no cure for diabetes -- because treating diabetics is just too darned profitable. Big Pharma is drooling over the profit potential of seeing one-third of Americans becoming diabetic by 2050. It will mean hundred of billions of dollars in annual profits.

But people are curing diabetes every day. It's simple and straightforward, and when you cure diabetes, you greatly reduce your risk of heart disease, obesity and cancer at the same time. The thing is, no one will cure your diabetes for you. Sure, the drug companies want to "treat" you with diabetes drugs, but you have to keep taking those for a lifetime. They don't cure anything. The only real cure can come from YOU -- by changing what you eat and increasing your exercise.

Drew Carey did it. I did it. Countless others have done it. You can do it, too. Read more about diabetes here on NaturalNews at:

And I urge you to get started today! Just 30 days from now, you could be off insulin, off diabetes drugs and back on track with a healthy life.

Editor's note: Please work with a qualified naturopathic physician before engaging in any medication, dietary or exercise changes. They can help guide you toward the best results in a safe, effective way.

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Having low vitamin D caused High Risk of death for Diabetic

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Dr. Christel Joergensen and her colleagues at the Steno Diabetes Center in Gentofte, Denmark, found that diabetics with blood levels of vitamin D lower than 13.9 nmol/L (5.6 ng/mL) are nearly twice as likely as those with levels above 13.9 nmol/L to develop heart disease. These same patients were more than twice as likely to die compared to those with higher levels.

However, average vitamin D levels among the 289 participants in the study hovered around 35.7 nmol/L (14.3 ng/mL), which is still far below Vitamin D Council recommendations of between 125-200 nmol/L (50-80 ng/mL). In other words, even those patients with levels above the threshold used in the study were still severely deficient in vitamin D.

The direct correlation between vitamin D deficiency and disease is observable across the health spectrum. Everything from muscle pain and arthritis, to cancer and autoimmune disorders are aggravated and even caused by having insufficient amounts of vitamin D circulating in the blood (

(NaturalNews) A new study published in the American Diabetes Association journal Diabetes Care says that diabetics who are deficient in vitamin D have a significantly higher risk of dying from all causes or developing cardiovascular disease than those with higher levels of the vitamin. The findings support a multitude of current research on the importance of maintaining high blood levels of vitamin D, regardless of specific health conditions.

According to the Vitamin D Council, spending 20 to 30 minutes in the summer sun produces roughly 10,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D in white skin, while other sources suggest up to 20,000 IU. Such levels are optimal, and are far higher than current government recommendations of 200 to 400 IU a day.
Sources for this story include:

Vegetables Consumtion can Reduce Diabetes Risk

(NaturalNews) A diet high in green leafy vegetables can reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to a study conducted by researchers from Leicester University in the United Kingdom, and published in the British Medical Journal.

The researchers analyzed the results of six prior studies that examined the relationship between vegetable intake and diabetes risk in a total of 220,000 adults. While there was no strong connection between general vegetable intake and a lower risk, eating at least a serving and a half of green leafy vegetables every day reduced diabetes risk by 14 percent.

For the purposes of the study, the category of green leafy vegetables also included cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower.

The researchers were unsure why green leafy vegetables in particular appeared to confer such a strong protective benefit. They suggested that it might have to do with those vegetables' high antioxidant content, or their high levels of magnesium.

Iain Frame of Diabetes UK warned that people should not interpret the study to mean they only need to eat green leafy vegetables and can forego other fruits and vegetables.

"We would be concerned if focusing on certain foods detracted from the advice to eat five portions of fruits and vegetables a day, which has benefits in terms of reducing heart disease, stroke, some cancers and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes."

Lead researcher Melanie Davis agreed that it is still important to get five servings of fruits and vegetables each day, but noted that "people like very specific health messages."

"We know that intake of fruit and vegetables is important, but this study suggests that green leafy vegetables seem to be particularly important in terms of preventing diabetes," she said.

To learn more about how to fight disease with a healthy diet, read the free report "Nutrition Can Save America!" at
Sources for this story include:

How To Reduce Impact Type 2 Diabetes

Monday, December 13, 2010

If you or a loved one has type 2 diabetes, you're not alone. More than 18 million Americans have type 2 diabetes.

For many people with type 2 diabetes, controlling blood sugar is a struggle every day. In fact, a report issued last year by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) showed that two out of three Americans with type 2 diabetes analyzed in a study were not in control of their blood sugar.

It is important to control blood sugar because it lowers the risk of serious health problems later. Diabetes can cause heart disease, stroke, blindness, loss of limbs and kidney disease.

But now, there's new help to better manage type 2 diabetes. Life and fitness coach Bob Harper of NBC's "The Biggest Loser" and a panel of diabetes experts created easy-to-understand and motivational steps people can take to get their blood sugar down. They are called 6.5 Steps Toward Better Blood Sugar Control. These steps are different because they can fit easily into everyday living.

"Through my years of coaching and training, I've worked with many people with type 2 diabetes and have seen how hard it can be to live with this disease," said Bob Harper. "But I learned that anyone can change their life. It's all about finding the right tools and motivation. I urge people with type 2 diabetes to step it up and use the 6.5 Steps and make them a part of their daily lives."

The 6.5 Steps can help people with type 2 diabetes every day because they focus on the basics of diabetes management: eating healthy, being physically active, monitoring blood sugar and, when appropriate, taking one or more medicines. These all play a part to help lower blood sugar.

Healthy Eating: Healthy eating reduces the risk for complications such as heart disease and stroke. Good choices include many foods, such as vegetables, whole grains, fruits, nonfat dairy products, beans, and lean meats, poultry and fish. There is no one perfect food, but watching portion sizes is key to a healthy diet.

Physical Activity: Regular physical activity can lower blood sugar levels. It can also help manage weight and reduce the risk of developing heart disease and high blood pressure. There are little things people with type 2 diabetes can do every day to be more active, such as walking with a friend or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Blood Sugar Monitoring: There are two tests for checking blood sugar. One test is the blood sugar monitoring that patients do on their own. It gives people with diabetes a check of their blood sugar level at the time the test is taken. The other one is called the A1C test. The A1C test shows a person's average blood sugar levels over the previous two to three months. Experts say that a good A1C goal is 6.5 percent or less for most people with type 2 diabetes.

Medicines: Most people with type 2 diabetes take medicine to help control their blood sugar levels. Many need more than one medicine to help treat the disease in different ways.

For people with type 2 diabetes, it is important that they team up with their doctor or other health care professional and think of them as a partner. They should work with their health care team to make a plan to get their blood sugar under control.

Beware of Hypoglycemia In Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Under results of a new study, hypoglycemia, which is a drop in levels of blood sugar, and is severe enough to cause seizures or coma in young children with type 1 diabetes (those who develop the disease very early in life) does not appear to result in impairments in mental ability or behavior.

According to experts and scientific evidence, the hippocampus (a region of the brain) is particularly sensitive to prolonged episodes of severe hypoglycemia. And experts stated that "young children with type 1 diabetes are at greatest risk of severe hypoglycemic events, and this has focused concern on the potential for hypoglycemic insult to impact on central nervous system development".

After compare 41 type 1 diabetic adolescents and children -who had a history of hypoglycemia with coma or seizure- to 43 similar diabetic subjects but without a history of severe hypoglycemic events, findings demonstrate that a subgroup of patients who had early first seizure showed more episodes of hypoglycemic seizure or coma in comparison to those who experienced a seizure at an older age.

The team applied different tests of learning and memory, but also intellectual and behavioral tests. The astonishing thing is that there were no significant differences between the seizure and no-seizure groups on the intellectual, memory or behavioral measures.

The main conclusion of the report is that results provide "some reassurance to those treating children with type 1 diabetes with intensive treatment that seizures/coma at a young age does not necessarily result in gross cognitive or behavioral impairment".